Emma

Emma is a shy Sheltie and is wary of new people, places, and situations. If she is frightened, she can panic and bolt. She should be considered a flight risk. Her new home must have a secure fenced yard with direct access into/out of the house (no exceptions to this requirement). She needs a home that has experience with shy dogs, preferably Shelties. Emma has a chronic condition called Rhinitis that causes her nose to run. Oral steroids treat the Rhinitis, but it will likely return, requiring additional treatments. 
 
Emma has shown herself able to adapt and adjust both in her foster home and as a vacation foster. The personality beneath her shyness is delightful. She is 4 years old and very playful - enjoying indoor play sessions with the other dogs in her foster home. Emma is affectionate and seeks out contact and loves petting and being brushed. She has a happy, joyful nature that shows when she is running in the yard or following her foster people around the house.  Emma is easy to handle and care for.  She will make you smile and even laugh out loud!
 
1. Emma’s new home must have a secure fenced yard with direct access into/out of the house and no gaps.  All MNSR dogs are indoor dogs and should not be left outside unattended (not even in a fenced yard, if the adopter is not at home).
2. Emma is a shy sheltie and wary of new people, places, and situations.   If she is frightened, she can
panic and bolt.   She should be considered a flight risk.
3.    Emma must go to a home that has experience with shy dogs, preferably Shelties. 
 
Please read the following information completely before inquiring or applying.
 
Age:  Emma turned 4 in September.
 
Size:  Emma weighs 33 lb and is at a healthy weight.
 
Temperament:   Emma is a shy sheltie who is wary of new things – people, places, and things!  She has shown herself able to adapt and adjust both in her foster home and as a vacation foster.   The personality beneath this shyness is delightful.   She is very playful and is currently enjoying indoor play sessions with the other dogs.   Emma is affectionate and seeks out contact and love petting and being
brushed.    She has a happy, joyful nature that shows when she is running in the yard or following her
foster people around the house.    Emma is easy to handle and care for.   She will make you smile and
even laugh out loud!
 
Fence:  Emma should be considered a flight risk and needs a secure physical fence (vinyl, wood or chain link), with securely locked gates and direct access from the house.  
 
Dogs: Emma gets along well with other dogs.   We think she would benefit from a gentle, social dog who 
could help her build confidence and be a playmate to her.    She is always trying to get me or foster dogs to play!
 
Cats:  Emma has not been exposed to cats.
 
Kids:  There are no kids in her current foster home.   She would do better with older kids who can follow instructions on how to properly interact with a shy sheltie. 
 
Crate-trained:   Emma’s crate is her go-to spot for relaxing.   She often sleeps in her crate at night.   She 
has been crated for several hours at a time without problems.   
 
House-trained:  Emma is housebroken.    She does need to be let out first thing in the morning and right before bed.    Occasional accidents have occurred when she was not let out first thing.    In her foster home, she is let out periodically throughout the day.   She will let you know she needs to go out by pacing frantically.
 
Obedience training:  Emma has had no formal training.   She is working on basic commands like Sit and
Down and understands the words necessary for day-to-day activity (inside, outside, hungry, play, TREAT, potty, etc.).   Emma is also working on doggy manners with people and other dogs.  Very treat motivated!   
 
Leash Manners:  Emma can be leashed easily.   She will walk on a leash, though not well at this point.
 
Car Rides:  Emma rides quietly in a crate.
 
Activity Level:  Emma has a normal activity level for a 4-year-old sheltie.   She does need exercise 
each day.   She loves being out of doors and will follow her foster around the yard while she does chores.  She also enjoys just sitting out in the yard.   Emma loves to run loops and figure 8’s in the yard.   She is starting to learn to fetch a tennis ball and will often bring the ball back and drop it.   
 
Barking:   If out of doors, Emma will bark at noisy vehicles passing (foster lives on a busy highway) and vehicles coming up the driveway.
 
She rarely barks in the house – usually just when she has been alone and someone comes home or when she is trying to get one of the other dogs to play with her.   Her barking is typical for a sheltie and not excessive.   She will stop barking if distracted.    
 
Experienced Home:  Emma needs a home with someone who is willing to continue working with her.  She has come a long way since she was rescued and has shown us that she can adapt to new situations.
Recently, she spent over a week with a vacation foster and did really well – so we know she can adjust.    Emma will require gentle patience as she transitions to her forever home.  Frequent short interactions are needed to keep her bonded.   She will need to be worked with on a daily basis to allow her lots of practice with all the new things in her life.        
 
Health Issues:  When Emma arrived in rescue, she had a runny nose on the left side.   Despite treatment with antibiotics and a nasal wash, the condition persisted.   Emma was taken to the University Vet Center where a CT scan and rhinoscopy were done.   The UM Vet diagnosed Emma with chronic rhinitis (formally called idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation).   Although they don’t know for sure what causes this, it is likely that the condition started out with some kind of immune response to a bacteria or virus or an allergy at some time in the past.   Emma got over the infection, but is still having the immune response from time to time.   This response causes inflammation which is what gives her the runny nose.
After her diagnosis, Emma was treated with a round of oral steroids ($11 for the treatment).   She responded well and currently does not have the runny nose.
Rhinitis is a lifelong condition, so the runny nose will  likely recur.   The condition is not life threatening nor is it contagious for other pets in the household.   An adopter will need to be willing to watch her and get her to the vet as needed and administer medication (e.g., oral or inhaled steroids, antibiotics).